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First Day of Kindergarten

MAXimum Chances would love to share a story of an amazing little boy and his incredible milestone!  Today our first Maximum Chances child at the Journey Learning center is headed off to school.  Gorgeous Brooks is starting kindergarten!  Now obviously that’s a milestone many children will begin today, but for Brooks, and many children on the spectrum, this is a big step.  He was largely non-verbal until just a year ago!  Diagnosed with autism around the age of 2, Brooks has worked incredibly hard to get where he is today.  He has been at the wonderful Journey Learning Center for more than 18 months, attending 5 days a week and nearly 8 hours a day.  He has learned to count, say and write his name, set the lunch table and interact with his little friends as well as the teachers.   Imagine learning 5 years of life skills in such a condensed period of time like that!

Sending a child on the autism spectrum off to school where they will largely be integrated with a mainstreamed classroom is such a dream for many parents.  Brooks is an amazing warrior and the incredible staff at Journey have worked so hard with him.  No doubt this is incredibly rewarding for them to see him be so successful.

We stopped by the Journey Learning Center on his last day to congratulate him and take some pictures of him having fun with friends.  He is such a joy to be around, and that smile is quite infectious.  Congrats to Brooks and his family, we are so happy to be sharing in this wonderful day with you!

For more information on the Journey Learning Center, visit their site, http://www.journeylearning.org

Learning Center for Autism

Above is Brooks with all of his friends eating lunch!  And below is one of his favorite activities, riding his bike, and playing on the playground.

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One of the activities he worked on was journaling about his day.  Here he is copying the sentence “I cut a hat,” talking about how he made a graduation hat earlier in the day.  Look at that gorgeous handwriting!

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Goofing around making everyone smile. 🙂

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Learning Center for Autism

We couldn’t be prouder of you Brooks!  We can’t wait to see where life takes you!

Learning Center for Autism

1 Comment
  1. Way to go Brooks!! What a blessing MAXimum Chances has provided this sweet boy and his family!

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Autism by the Numbers

The costs of behavioral intervention therapy for children with Autism Spectrum Disorder can reach up to $60,000 per child each year.


It is estimated that medical costs associated with caring for a child with Autism Spectrum Disorder are up to $20,000 higher annually than caring for a child without.


It is estimated that Autism costs the nation $137 billion per year, no doubt the rising ate of children diagnosed will increase this figure dramatically.


In 2010 the National Institute of Health (NIH) allocated just $218 million of it’s $35.6 billion dollar budget to Autism. This number represents less than 0.6% of total NIH funding.


More children will be diagnosed with autism this year than pediatric AIDS, juvenile diabetes and cancer combined.


Autism is the fastest growing developmental disorder in the United States yet the most underfunded.


Autism occurs in all racial, ethnic and socioeconomic groups.


While the cause of Autism is still unclear, current studies indicate genetics and exposure to environmental triggers both play a role in the autism prevalence increase.


Families with one child on the Autism Spectrum have an estimated 20% increased risk of having another child affected.


Between 30-5-% of people with Autism suffer from seizures.


It is estimated that up to 40% of children with Autism do not speak.


Boys are four times more likely to have autism than girls. More specifically that number is 1 in 42 boys and 1 in 189 girls.


In 2014 the Center for Disease Control determined that approximately 1 in 68 children is diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in the United States. In 2000 this number was 1 in 250 children

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